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Is Mozambique's elite moving from corruption to development?

Hanlon, Joseph and Mosse, Marcelo (2009). Is Mozambique's elite moving from corruption to development? In: UNU-WIDER Conference on the Role of Elites in Economic Development, 12-13 Jun 2009, Helsinki, Finland.

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Abstract

Mozambique's elite has responded to five decades of rapid change and international pressure by staying united and steering a course that tried to balance the conflicting pressures of national development, self-interest, and the demands of the international community. This paper argues that after a period of donor-supported corruption, crude rent-seeking and unsuccessful Washington Consensus policies, the elite has shifted into using the state to promote the creation of business groups that could be large enough and dynamic enough to follow a development model with some similarities to the Asian Tigers, industrial development in Latin America, or Volkskapitalisme in apartheid South Africa.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Development
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
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Item ID: 20888
Depositing User: Joseph Hanlon
Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2010 14:55
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2019 00:01
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/20888
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