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Is Social Measurement Possible, and is it Necessary?

Hammersley, Martyn (2010). Is Social Measurement Possible, and is it Necessary? In: Walford, Geoffrey; Tucker, Eric and Viswanathan, Madhu eds. Sage Handbook of Measurement. London, UK: Sage, pp. 409–426.

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Abstract

About the book:
The Sage Handbook of Measurement is a unique methodological resource in which Walford, Viswanathan and Tucker draw together contributions from leading scholars in the social sciences, each of whom has played an important role in advancing the study of measurement over the past 25 years. Each of the contributors offers insights into particular measurement related challenges they have confronted and how they have addressed these.


Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of measurement, so that the handbook as a whole covers the full spectrum of core issues related to design, method and analysis within measurement studies. The book emphasises issues such as indicator generation and modification, the nature and conceptual meaning of measurement error, and the day-to-day processes involved in developing and using measures.


The Handbook covers the full range of disciplines where measurement studies are common: policy studies; education studies; health studies; and business studies.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Copyright Holders: 2010 Sage Publications
ISBN: 1-4129-4814-2, 978-1-4129-4814-2
Academic Unit/Department: Education and Language Studies > Childhood, Development and Learning
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 20480
Depositing User: Users 9543 not found.
Date Deposited: 13 May 2010 15:34
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2012 09:57
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/20480
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