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Unlocking the potential of public sector information with Semantic Web technology

Alani, Harith; Dupplaw, David; Sheridan, John; O'Hara, Kieron; Darlington, John; Shadbolt, Nigel and Tullo, Carol (2007). Unlocking the potential of public sector information with Semantic Web technology. In: The 6th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC), 11-15 Nov 2007, Busan, Korea.

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Governments often hold very rich data and whilst much of this information is published and available for re-use by others, it is often trapped by poor data structures, locked up in legacy data formats or in fragmented databases. One of the great benefits that Semantic Web (SW) technology offers is facilitating the large scale integration and sharing of distributed data sources. At the heart of information policy in the UK, the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) is the part of the UK government charged with enabling the greater re-use of public sector information. This paper describes the actions, findings, and lessons learnt from a pilot study, involving several parts of government and the public sector. The aim was to show to government how they can adopt SW technology for the dissemination, sharing and use of its data.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2007 The Authors
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Knowledge Media Institute (KMi)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)
Item ID: 20028
Depositing User: Harith Alani
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2010 16:31
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 02:56
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