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Low-fi skin vision: A case study in rapid prototyping a sensory substitution system

Bird, Jon; Marshall, Paul and Rogers, Yvonne (2009). Low-fi skin vision: A case study in rapid prototyping a sensory substitution system. In: Proceedings of the 2009 British Computer Society Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 1-5 Sept 2009, Cambridge, UK, pp. 55–64.

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Abstract

We describe the design process we have used to develop a minimal, twenty vibration motor Tactile Vision Sensory Substitution (TVSS) system which enables blind-folded subjects to successfully track and bat a rolling ball and thereby experience 'skin vision'. We have employed a low-fi rapid prototyping approach to build this system and argue that this methodology is particularly effective for building embedded interactive systems. We support this argument in two ways. First, by drawing on theoretical insights from robotics, a discipline that also has to deal with the challenge of building complex embedded systems that interact with their environments; second, by using the development of our TVSS as a case study: describing the series of prototypes that led to our successful design and highlighting what we learnt at each stage.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Authors
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 19507
Depositing User: Jochen Rick
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2010 10:39
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 19:57
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/19507
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