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The 'broken society' election: class hatred and the politics of poverty and place in Glasgow East

Mooney, Gerry (2009). The 'broken society' election: class hatred and the politics of poverty and place in Glasgow East. Social Policy and Society, 8(4) pp. 437–450.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1017/S1474746409990029
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Abstract

This paper considers some of the ways in which representations of people experiencing poverty and disadvantaged places continue to be informed by ideas of individual inadequacy, dependency and disorder. Drawing on media reportage of poverty during the Glasgow East by-election in July 2008, it argues not only that people defined as 'poor' and locales that are severely disadvantaged continue to be 'othered' through such narratives, but also that this provides a clear indication of the ways in which the politics of poverty and state welfare are increasingly being fought-out in the media. It is argued that such misrecognition amounts to social injustice and stands in the way of progressive approaches to poverty and social welfare

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 Cambridge University Press
ISSN: 1474-7464
Keywords: poverty; social welfare; social injustice; media representation
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 18562
Depositing User: Gerry Mooney
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2009 09:43
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 18:56
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/18562
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