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Where's the harm? A social marketing approach to reframing 'problem' drinking cultures

Carrigan, M.; Lindridge, Andrew; MacAskill, S.; Eadie, D.; Gordon, R. and Heim, D. (2009). Where's the harm? A social marketing approach to reframing 'problem' drinking cultures. In: 38th European Marketing Academy Conference, May 26-29 2009, Audencia, Nantes.

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Abstract

Alcohol consumption is often linked to a broad range of social and health problems, yet alcohol also plays a fundamental role in social bonding between people. This paper considers the potential of social marketing to contribute to alcohol consumption reduction and reframe social norms that encourage 'problem' drinking. Based on qualitative research with a variety of Scottish drinkers, the paper emphasises how and why a better understanding of the culturally bound meanings of alcohol (e.g. social identity, self-concept) are of crucial importance to inform any social marketing approach to reframing excessive drinking.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Authors
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetNHS Health Scotland
Keywords: social marketing; social norms; drinking cultures;
Academic Unit/Department: Open University Business School
Item ID: 18521
Depositing User: Marylyn Carrigan
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2009 08:38
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2016 20:46
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/18521
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