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Software development cultures and cooperation problems: a field study of the early stages of development of software for a scientific community

Segal, Judith (2009). Software development cultures and cooperation problems: a field study of the early stages of development of software for a scientific community. Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 18(5-6) pp. 581–606.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-009-9096-9
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Abstract

In earlier work, I identified a particular class of end-user developers, who include scientists and whom I term 'professional end-user developers', as being of especial interest. Here, I extend this work by articulating a culture of professional end-user development, and illustrating by means of a field-study how the influence of this culture causes cooperation problems in an inter-disciplinary team developing a software system for a scientific community. My analysis of the field study data is informed by some recent literature on multi-national work cultures. Whilst acknowledging that viewing a scientific development through a lens of software development culture does not give a full picture, I argue that it nonetheless provides deep insights.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 Springer
ISSN: 0925-9724
Keywords: community software development; cooperation; field study; scientific software development; software development culture; professional end-user developers
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 18494
Depositing User: Judith Segal
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2009 15:38
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2016 07:29
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/18494
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