The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Rotational excitation of molecules by electron collisions

Itikawa, Yukikazu and Mason, Nigel (2005). Rotational excitation of molecules by electron collisions. Physics Reports, 414(1) pp. 1–41.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physrep.2005.04.002
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The anisotropic charge distribution of a molecule can easily induce a rotational transition in the molecule during an electron collision. Further, since the level spacing of the rotational states is very small, the transition can take place over a wide range of electron energies. The rotational excitation is the dominant energy-loss process for an electron in a molecular gas, when the electron energy lies below the vibrational threshold of the molecule. In the case of polar molecules, the rotationally excited molecule promptly emits microwave (or far infrared) radiation. In this way, the rotational excitation effectively cools electrons. The present paper reviews theoretical and experimental studies of the electron-impact rotational excitation of molecules. After a general introduction of the relevant theory and experiment, case studies of five different molecular species (H-2, N-2, CH4, HCl, and H2O) are presented to show the characteristics of rotational cross sections. From those studies, common features of the cross sections are discussed.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V.
ISSN: 0370-1573
Keywords: Electron collisions; Molecules; Rotation
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Physical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
eSTEeM
Item ID: 18225
Depositing User: Colin Smith
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2009 15:01
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2014 10:29
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/18225
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk