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Skilled migratory regimes: The case of female medical migrants in the UK

Raghuram, Parvati and Montiel, Dawn (2003). Skilled migratory regimes: The case of female medical migrants in the UK. In: Ishikawa, Yoshitaka and Montanari, Armando eds. The new geography of human mobility - Inequality trends? Home of Geography Publication series (4). Rome, Italy,: Home of Geography/Villa Celimontana (International Geographical Union/Società Geografica Italiana), pp. 67–84.

URL: http://www.homeofgeography.org/uk/
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Abstract

About the book:
In post-industrial society, mobility in the working and leisure related activities tends to take on subtle differences as far as place of work, free time, recreation, training and continuing education are concerned. Human mobility is sensitive to change in the organisational plan and logistics of a model which is mainly concerned with demand. The concentration of mobility flows occurs as a result of the devolution of production centres and the consumption of these products is the determining component of mobility, whereas in the past traditional political administrative boundary trends were the factors which determined mobility. Inequality in human mobility is considered from the point of view of the divide between developed and developing countries, the unskilled/skilled perspective, and the relationships between internal and international flows.

The fourth volume in the Home of Geography Publication series assembles the research carried out by the IGU Commission on Global Change and Human Mobility (Globility) during the course of meetings organised in three locations that are particularly significant for human mobility: California, where the metaphor "melting pot" has been replaced by the term "cauldron“; South Africa, on the occasion of an IGU Regional Conference, whose position enabled the participation of a consistent number of geographers from developing countries; and, last but not least, Mongolia, where migratory flows have until today continued to modify the ethnic and cultural map of the region.

Item Type: Book Chapter
ISBN: 88-88692-09-6, 978-88-88692-09-8
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Geography
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 17432
Depositing User: Users 4807 not found.
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2009 13:12
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 20:33
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/17432
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