The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Television alcohol advertising: Do children really mean what they say?

Nash, Avril S.; Pine, Karen J. and Messer, David J. (2009). Television alcohol advertising: Do children really mean what they say? British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27(1) pp. 85–104.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/026151008X349470
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Few studies have investigated children's responses to television alcohol advertising. Two separate studies evaluated the appeal of alcohol advertisements on children aged 7-10. An exploratory interview study (N=17) was carried out to assess children's verbal responses to both alcohol and non-alcohol advertisements and to elicit vocabulary to be used in the second study. Whilst the 7-8 years old children were very positive about the alcohol advertisements, older children did not like them, nor did they perceive them to be effective. The second study was designed to assess children's implicit knowledge, in view of developmental theory that knowledge is not always available for verbal report. This study (N=179) used a simple categorization programme on computer. Using this methodology, children of all ages liked the alcohol advertisements and perceived them as effective. Advertising styles affected popularity with humour, cartoon format or the inclusion of an animal, or character increasing the appeal of an advertisement. The discussion draws attention to the importance of multiple methodologies in eliciting valid and accurate information from children, and to policy matters with regard to alcohol advertising regulation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 The British Psychological Society
ISSN: 0261-510X
Academic Unit/Department: Education and Language Studies > Childhood, Development and Learning
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 16574
Depositing User: Wendy Hunt
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2009 12:34
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2012 15:39
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/16574
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk