The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Do children with autism who pass false belief tasks understand the mind as active interpreter?

Luckett, T.; Powell, S. D.; Messer, D.; Thornton, M. E. and Schulz, J. (2002). Do children with autism who pass false belief tasks understand the mind as active interpreter? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32(2) pp. 127–140.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014844722931
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Interpretive diversity is the term used by Carpendale and Chandler (1996) to refer to the fact that two individuals exposed to precisely the same stimulus may interpret it in quite different, but equally plausible, ways. An appreciation of interpretive diversity is said by Carpendale and Chandler to represent a development in understanding that is qualitatively different from that necessary to succeed on false belief tasks. A study is reported in which children with autism and children with general delay were given a battery of tasks consisting of false belief tasks and tasks designed to test for an understanding of interpretive diversity. Findings from the present study offer limited support for Carpendale and Chandler's claim that tasks which test for an understanding of interpretive diversity may be more difficult than false belief tasks. Between-group differences in the consistency and quality of responses given by participants suggest that autistic and delayed children may have differed somewhat in their approach to the tasks given.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0162-3257
Academic Unit/Department: Education and Language Studies > Childhood, Development and Learning
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 16554
Depositing User: Wendy Hunt
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2009 15:42
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 13:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/16554
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk