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Remembering the Khoikhoi victory over Dom Francisco Almeida at the Cape in 1510

Johnson, David (2009). Remembering the Khoikhoi victory over Dom Francisco Almeida at the Cape in 1510. Postcolonial Studies, 12(1) pp. 107–130.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/13688790802657427
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Abstract

The general issue of how key moments of anti-colonial struggle are remembered in different colonial and postcolonial contexts is considered in relation to the specific case of the Khoikhoi victory over Viceroy Francisco Almeida in Table Bay on 1 March 1510. The contrasting literary and historical versions of the Khoikhoi victory are examined in three contexts: first, in the sixteenth-century Portuguese writings of the poet Luis Vaz de Camoes and the chroniclers Joao de Barros, Fernao Lopez de Castanheda, Damiao de Gois and Gaspar Correa; secondly, in the writings of British intellectuals of the period 1770-1830, including Robert Southey, William Julius Mickle and William Robertson; and thirdly, in the writings of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Southern Africans, including historian George McCall Theal, novelist Andre Brink and South African president Thabo Mbeki. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Institute of Postcolonial Studies
ISSN: 1368-8790
Keywords: imperial & colonial history; post-colonial studies; postcolonialism; social & cultural anthropology
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Cultures > English & Creative Writing
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Cultures
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Postcolonial and Global Literatures Research Group (PGL)
Item ID: 16219
Depositing User: David Johnson
Date Deposited: 11 May 2009 09:09
Last Modified: 02 May 2018 13:00
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/16219
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