The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Machinery of government and standards in public service: Teaching new dogs old tricks

Du Gay, Paul (2006). Machinery of government and standards in public service: Teaching new dogs old tricks. Economy and Society, 35(1) pp. 148–167.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03085140500465949
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

For much of the last thirty years the main leitmotif animating Civil Service reform in the UK has been that efficiency and effectiveness in public services can be achieved by adapting management methods and practices derived from commercial enterprise. In the process of making the dreams and schemes of that plural singularity we have come to call `managerialism' operational though, something valuable appears to have been lost, and that something is the Civil Service as a unified `constitutional bureaucracy'. In this article I explore some of the unfortunate governmental and administrative consequences of these managerially minded reforms. In particular, I seek to highlight the continuing relevance of what have been routinely characterized as outmoded and anachronistic machineries of government, and to stress the importance of the increasingly forgotten core business of public administration: the running of a state and of a constitution.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0308-5147
Keywords: Public administration; Civil service; Local government; Public welfare; Management; Bureaucracy; Civil service reform; Political planning; Constitition and Philosophy; Government; Managerialism; Public service; Great Britain;
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Item ID: 16008
Depositing User: Users 8955 not found.
Date Deposited: 13 May 2009 13:31
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 20:27
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/16008
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk