The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Building knowledge translation capability into public-sector innovation processes

Savory, Clive (2009). Building knowledge translation capability into public-sector innovation processes. Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, 21(2) pp. 149–171.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537320802625223
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Public-sector organisations are increasingly becoming aware of the need to harness the innovative capacity of their employees. In the UK many public-sector research institutes have put in place processes to increase the speed at which new technological innovations are exploited and commercialised. These types of initiatives have also been implemented into public-sector service organisations. For these service organisations innovations occur not just from formal research projects but are also practice based, developed by staff in the course of their normal work. This paper suggests that practice-based innovations can be seen as relying heavily on Mode 2 knowledge production. Using the UK's National Health Service as an example, the characteristics of practice-based innovations are characterised as tightly coupled to their development context and combining hard and soft technologies. A model of knowledge translation capability is presented that supports Mode 2 knowledge production and is then used to analyse a case study of a practice-based NHS innovation. Implications for public-sector innovation policy are suggested and further areas of research into public-sector innovation processes outlined.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1465-3990
Keywords: user-led innovation; healthcare technology; knowledge translation capability; Mode 2 knowledge production; NHS
Academic Unit/Department: Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Computing & Communications
Item ID: 13186
Depositing User: Clive Savory
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2009 11:59
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 14:39
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/13186
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk