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Long term disc variability in the Be star o Andromedae

Clark, J. S.; Tarasov, A. E. and Panko, E. A. (2003). Long term disc variability in the Be star o Andromedae. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 403 pp. 239–246.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:20030248
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Abstract

We present 18 years of high resolution and S/N H α spectroscopy of the Be shell star o And, obtained between 1985-2002. Spectra taken during late 1985 show a pure photospheric profile, with disc re-formation commencing in 1986; a process that is found to occur over long timescales (103 days). Analysis of the evolution of the properties of the H α shell profile suggest that the disc kinematics are dominated by rotational motion. It has been shown that disc loss in o And occurs "inside out''; we find that the disc also appears to be rebuilt in a similar manner, with disc material gradually diffusing to larger radii. The long timescale for changes in the bulk properties of the disc, domination of rotational over radial velocities and manner of disc loss and formation are all consistent with the predictions of the viscous decretion disc model for Be star discs.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2003 ESO
ISSN: 1432-0746
Keywords: stars; circumstellar matter; early type stars
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Physical Sciences
Science
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 13143
Depositing User: Astrid Peterkin
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2009 16:45
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2016 21:16
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/13143
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