The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Using formal concept analysis to construct and visualise hierarchies of socio-technical relations

Wermelinger, Michel; Yu, Yijun and Strohmaier, Markus (2009). Using formal concept analysis to construct and visualise hierarchies of socio-technical relations. In: Proceedings of the 31st International Conference on Software Engineering, Companion Volume, 18-24 May 2009, Vancouver, IEEE.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (182Kb)
URL: http://www.cs.uoregon.edu/events/icse2009/home/
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1109/ICSE-COMPANION.2009.5071013
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Interest in the human aspects of software engineering has grown in the past years. For example, based on activity logs in software artefact repositories, researchers are recommending who should fix a bug for a certain component. However, existing work largely follows ad-hoc approaches to relate software artefacts to developers and rarely makes those socio-technical relations explicit in a single structure. In this paper we propose a novel application of formal concept analysis, in order to overcome those deficiencies. As a case study, we construct and visualise different views of the developers who fix and discuss bugs in the Eclipse project.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 IEEE
Extra Information: Appears in Proceedings of the 31st International Conference on Software Engineering, Companion Volume, pp 327-330
Academic Unit/Department: Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Computing & Communications
Mathematics, Computing and Technology
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 13074
Depositing User: Michel Wermelinger
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2009 13:33
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2016 07:02
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/13074
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

▼ Automated document suggestions from open access sources

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk