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The Idea of Police in Eighteenth-Century England: Discipline, Reformation, Superintendence, c. 1780–1800

Dodsworth, F.M. (2008). The Idea of Police in Eighteenth-Century England: Discipline, Reformation, Superintendence, c. 1780–1800. Journal of the History of Ideas, 69(4) pp. 583–605.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jhi.0.0016
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Abstract

Recent years have seen considerable interest in the idea of "police" in the eighteenth century.1 "Police" in this archaic sense did not mean a uniformed force employed by the state to govern law and order, it implied a much more general system of government, the task of which was to regulate broad aspects of communal existence with the aim of establishing the common good of the community and was closely associated with maintenance of the moral order, security and the maximization of national resources.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0022-5037
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
Item ID: 12874
Depositing User: Francis Dodsworth
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2009 09:09
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2013 19:33
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/12874
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