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The brain makes the fit: on the materialist hypothesis to consciousness, neuropsychology and person-organisation fit

Billsberry, Jon; Moss-Jones, John and Marsh, Philip (2002). The brain makes the fit: on the materialist hypothesis to consciousness, neuropsychology and person-organisation fit. In: Academy of Management, Annual Meeting, 2002, Denver, Colorado.

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Abstract

This theory paper presents an analysis of the materialist hypothesis to consciousness and its implications for person–organization (P–O) fit. Some implications from neuropsychology are also considered. Three implications
for P–O fit are discussed: (1) how it affects the underpinning theory; (2) how it changes our definition of the term; and, (3) how P–O fit is captured. The materialist hypothesis reinforces the underpinning theory, but causes a redefinition of P–O fit. It suggests that P–O fit should be defined in terms of the individual employee's unconscious physical interaction of internal features and environmental stimuli. The review also suggests that researchers need to consider using data gathering techniques that capture unconscious dimensions
of P–O fit.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2002 The Authors
Extra Information: Some of the symbols may not have transferred correctly into this bibliographic record and/or abstract.
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
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Item ID: 1253
Depositing User: Users 12 not found.
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2006
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2016 15:06
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/1253
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