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Managing the transition from bricks-and-mortar to clicks-and-mortar: a business perspective

Barnes, David; Hinton, Matthew and Mieczkowska, Suzanne (2004). Managing the transition from bricks-and-mortar to clicks-and-mortar: a business perspective. Knowledge and Process Management, 11(3) pp. 199–209.

URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstrac...
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/kpm.205
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Abstract

This paper reports from case study-based research that investigates the impact of the transition from bricks-and-mortar to clicks-and-mortar businesses on the management of core internal business processes. It has two main aims: firstly, to identify the business models for the processes of order fulfilment and delivery used in clicks-and-mortar e-businesses, and any organizational and environmental factors affecting these processes; secondly, to identify the main factors involved in the adoption and use of Internet-based ICTs for e-commerce in clicks-and-mortar e-businesses, and any organizational and environmental factors affecting adoption and use. Results from eight UK-based companies that have been changing from traditional bricks-and-mortar companies to clicks-and-mortar e-businesses are reported. Five main conclusions are drawn from a cross-case analysis: (1) increased integration in e-commerce business processes is inhibited by both technological and business barriers; (2) organizations display various and often confused motives for adopting e-commerce; (3) barriers to the increased adoption of e-commerce are not just technological, but also sociological and economic; (4) the adoption of e-commerce challenges existing supply network relationships; (5) the adoption of e-commerce is tending to automate rather than redesign existing business processes. A three-pronged approach to future research work in this under-researched area is recommended. This encompasses undertaking longitudinal case study research to track e-commerce developments over time, extending the range of cases to include other industry sectors (such as not for profits), and undertaking survey research across a large number of organizations, using quantitative methods, to test the generalizability of the findings from this research. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 1092-4604
Academic Unit/Department: Open University Business School
Item ID: 1213
Depositing User: Users 12 not found.
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2006
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 19:45
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/1213
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