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Making Bioscience Related Health Innovations Work for the Poor: Are Public-Private Partnerships the Answer?

Chataway, Jo; Hanlin, Rebecca; Murphy, Joseph and Smith, James (2005). Making Bioscience Related Health Innovations Work for the Poor: Are Public-Private Partnerships the Answer? ESRC Genomics Forum, UK.

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Abstract

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) in the area of health are currently the focus of considerable debate. They are seen by some as a way of overcoming the crisis of eglected diseasesand the fact that 90% of the world spending on health-related research benefits only 10% of its population.

A workshop hosted by the ESRC Genomics Forum and attended by policy experts, practitioners and academics examined the role of global PPPs (GPPPs) in developing new drugs and vaccines designed to combat diseases that are common in poorer countries. This policy brief focuses on two issues highlighted at the workshop. Participants felt these issues require the attention of policy makers if GPPPs are to be successful in the long-term.

Item Type: Other
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
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Item ID: 10976
Depositing User: Users 4181 not found.
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2008 14:08
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2016 18:13
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/10976
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