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MoonLITE – Technological feasibility of the penetrator concept

Smith, A.; Crawford, I. A.; Ball, A. J.; Barber, S. J.; Church, P.; Gao, Y.; Gowen, R. A.; Griffiths, A.; Hagermann, A.; Pike, W. T.; Phipps, A.; Sheridan, S.; Sims, M. R.; Talboys, D. L. and Wells, N. (2008). MoonLITE – Technological feasibility of the penetrator concept. In: 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 10-14 March 2008, League City, Texas, USA.

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Introduction: While the surface missions to the Moon of the 1960s and 1970s achieved a great deal, scientifically a great deal was also left unresolved. The recent plethora of lunar missions (flown or proposed) reflects resurgence in interest in the Moon, not only in its own right, but also as a record of the formation of the Earth-Moon System and the interplanetary environment at 1 AU. Results from orbiter missions have indicated the possible presense of ice within permanently shaded craters at the lunar poles [1] – a situation that, if confirmed, will have profound impacts on lunar exploration.

Item Type: Conference Item
Extra Information: Abstract number 1238
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 10491
Depositing User: Karen Guyler
Date Deposited: 31 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2016 09:12
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