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Assessment and Student Learning – a fundamental relationship and the role of information and communication technologies

Kirkwood, Adrian and Price, Linda (2008). Assessment and Student Learning – a fundamental relationship and the role of information and communication technologies. Open Learning, 23(1) pp. 5–16.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02680510701815160
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Abstract

This paper reviews the role of assessment in student learning and its relationship with the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). There is ample evidence of technology-led innovations failing to achieve the transformations expected by educators. We draw upon existing research to illustrate the links between aspects of student learning, assessment practices and the use of ICT. Assessment influences not only what parts of a course get studied, but also how those parts are studied. While the adoption of ICT does not, in itself, change student behaviours, appropriately designed assessment that exploits the potential of ICT can change students’ approaches to learning. We argue that ICT can enable important learning outcomes to be achieved, but these must be underpinned by an assessment strategy that cues students to adopt a suitable approach to learning.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0268-0513
Keywords: Assessment; information & communication technology; pedagogy; learning outcomes; student learning
Academic Unit/Department: Institute of Educational Technology
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 10072
Depositing User: Adrian Kirkwood
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2007
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2013 21:38
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/10072
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